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Pacific Union Referendum of 1933 by DaFreak47 Pacific Union Referendum of 1933 by DaFreak47
The Great War is little over a decade over. The Japanese Empire has invaded Manchuria. Chinese immigrants are taking Australian jobs, strengthening the "White Australia" movement. The British Royal Navy has retreated to Europe. The Great Depression has left Australia and other British dominions and colonies vulnerable to Asian expansionism. The British are in no position to provide aide or security. It is 1933. What are the British dominions, colonies, and mandates going to do with such great odds stacked against them?

"Today we stand here, representatives of our respective dominions, each with a common ancestry, to discuss the possibility of a 'Pacific Union', to protect the rights, security, and wealthfare of our citizens. Alone, we are small, underpopulated, and poorly defended. Together, we will step into the future, and take our place in history with the other great unions of the world".
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:iconjeffreybuchananp:
JeffreyBuchananP Featured By Owner Aug 9, 2014
One Question, Who is the Head of State for the Pacific Union? Is it still a British Monarch or the President?
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:icondafreak47:
DaFreak47 Featured By Owner Aug 17, 2014  Student Digital Artist
All of the colonies and dominions that voted to join the union withdrew from the Commonwealth. The Union's leader is a US style president, usually born in Australia, or sometimes New Zealand. 
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:iconansgar545:
Ansgar545 Featured By Owner Jul 4, 2014
Hm... I wonder who you stole this from. hmmm hmmm
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:icondafreak47:
DaFreak47 Featured By Owner Jul 4, 2014  Student Digital Artist
Do you mean the style? Cuz yeah, I used 1Blomma's style and I asked him before I did it. 
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:iconansgar545:
Ansgar545 Featured By Owner Jul 4, 2014
No you didn't :^)
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:icondafreak47:
DaFreak47 Featured By Owner Jul 5, 2014  Student Digital Artist
Rereading that long comment I did over a year ago, I see that I only asked him how he did it, not if I could do it. Ow well. Not all of his maps have original styles either. So meh
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:iconjburns272:
Jburns272 Featured By Owner Jul 8, 2013  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
Nice idea. It reminds me a bit of something I had planned for a future history (I'll post a link when/if I eventually post it).

The only real problem I have is naming the South Island of New Zealand, 'Aotearoa.' Historically, Aotearoa has only been used to refer to the North Island or the country as a whole, never for just the South Island.

Why did you let New Guinea have an independent vote but not Samoa and the other territories of New Zealand?

Tonga and the Pitcairn Islands staying out is a good touch. Western Australia too, though I wonder how the Western Australians were convinced to give up a good chunk of their territory.
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:icondafreak47:
DaFreak47 Featured By Owner Jul 8, 2013  Student Digital Artist
Thanks, I try and avoid making future maps myself, after my pathetic attempts when I first started mapping.

I named the south island Aotearoa because somebody else suggested it on the other map. Since "Aotearoa" is used to refer to New Zealand in its entirety, and well, "New Zealand" is also used to refer to New Zealand in its entirety, I decided that having the northern island, with its larger European population, retain the name New Zealand, and the southern island, with its larger Maori population, retain the name Aotearoa, would be more fitting and plausible.

Well, New Guinea recieved a vote because it was a "mandated territory" of Australia while Samoa was only a class C mandate. In all honesty I had completely forgotten about Samoa until very late in the map and it would have been too much trouble to deal with. The other territories of New Zealand weren't actually separate territories and most didnt recieve autonomy until after the POD. Plus the fact that the whole process of confederation was controlled by the government in Canberra and restricting the power of other, non-Australian states was high on their list.

I figured Tonga would never give up its monarchy and become a full on democracy, and the Pitcairn Islands were so far away, and probably only populated by a few British scientist, that the idea of joining a larger union of Pacific states wouldn't seem necessary to them. In OTL, 1933 (my POD) was the year that Western Australia held an actual referendum on whether or not to secede from the Confederation. The vote ended against secession, only barely, because of the growing population of easterners moving to the mines around Kalgoorlie. In this timeline, as soon as the idea for a "Pacific Union" goes public, politicians in Western Australia use the negative public opinion of Western Australians toward leaving the British Empire to help them achieve their goal of secession, and to make sure the vote is overwhelmingly positive, they hold a different referendum on whether or not the state of Auralia should be created. After this is achieved, the referendum for the Pacific Union in Western Australia is overwhelmingly negative.
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:iconjburns272:
Jburns272 Featured By Owner Jul 9, 2013  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
You're welcome.
Yes, I saw that other comment. I wasn't sure whether or not to interject there. I'm not sure where they were coming from with that. Aotearoa is one of the traditional names of the North Island (as well as the now more common 'Te Ika a Maui'). One traditional name for the South Island is 'Te Wai Pounamu' (along with 'Te Waka a Maui'). Altough Aotearoa has been in Pakeha (read European) useage since the 1890s, the Maori name for New Zealand as a whole was actually 'Niu Tireni,' a transliteration of New Zealand (This name was in use up until at least 1924 where it is used in an All Blacks haka 'Ko Niu Tireni').
Moreover, the south is actually more heavily dominated by European settlers than the north. Maori are more numerous (both in actual numbers and as a fraction of the population) and more powerful in the North Island than in the South Island.
I can see everything else, about Tonga, the Pitcairn Islands, Samoa, etc. The Pitcairn Islands are indeed very isolationist for example. And that's a good justification for Western Australia's succession. If you wanted to add another Australian state (and increase Canberra's power so to speak), North Queensland also has a secessionist movement. I don't know how active they were at the POD though.
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:icondafreak47:
DaFreak47 Featured By Owner Jul 9, 2013  Student Digital Artist
Yeah I probably could have put more effort into my research of New Zealand. When he mentioned "Aotearoa" I had never heard of it, so when I looked it up and the first thing I read was that it was an increasingly popular name for New Zealand, I kinda just used to without much thinking. I assumed that since the majority of large cities were located on the northern island, and how population density maps show the population in the north to be denser, that more Europeans settled in the north. I also based it on the fact that actual colonization of New Zealand started on the northern island, that it should retain the name New Zealand.

I do want to point out that my POD was 1933, at which time "Aotearoa" had begun to be used instead of New Zealand, and politicians sometimes put labels on areas where they dont necessarily belong. Plently of states in the USA have names that dont fit them or dont fit them singularly.
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